9 Comments

  1. Wow! I am very impressed. Go you!

    I guess I would just be curious about his faith journey. It’s easy to be jaded about Hollywood personalities, and I’ve always wondered what they really think, especially those who make movies with religious over (or under)tones. How does faith get lived out in a culture where you’re asked to portray things contrary to it? (You get the idea, right?)

    • Thanks Kathleen! We get your question! It’s a good area to explore – especially considering his past “rat pack” days and how that may have influenced his spiritual journey.

  2. My husband, Joseph, loved this movie and I posed your question to him. The following was his response:

    [1] Tom’s journey throughout The Way is marked by his scattering of Daniel’s cremated remains along El Camino de Santiago. Despite that Tom had experienced a lapse of faith, given Catholic teaching that cremated remains should be entombed or buried together and not scattered in that way, in developing the screenplay, did you have any qualms about that aspect of the plot?

    [2] Christianity is integral to the story and themes of The Way. The story begins with examples of Tom’s lapsed faith and anger at God over the loss of his son, Daniel. During his journey along El Camino de Santiago, Tom is met by reminders of faith, including a Catholic priest who offers Tom a Rosary. But upon their arrival at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, it is Joost who falls to his knees before the statue of Saint James and Jack who braves entry into the church and sobs while praying—what appears to have been his first prayer in many years. In the final scenes of the film, however, Tom does not appear to have a conversion of faith, but instead appears inspired by a more secular call to Carpe Diem. Was Tom’s redemption of faith lost in editing? Was a more secularized ending intended to appeal to a broader audience? How did this come to pass?

    • Thank you, Melanie/Joseph, for your thoughts and questions! I was also moved by the actions of the other three pilgrims, not only Joost’s, but Jack’s sobbing after he returned to church after being away for so long and Sarah’s admission at the end of the walk that she was on a religious pilgrimage all along. Good points regarding Tom’s conversion or lack thereof. Food for thought for us. Thanks for sharing!

  3. Sue

    How exciting!
    1–I heard rumors (when we saw The Way at the Varsity) that Emilio’s grandmother or great-gram had ties to Des Moines (used to live here). True?
    2–What’s the father/son relationship like in real-life? And how is Charlie doing? (okay, probably not relevant to the movie, but I’m curious!) :)

  4. Well done and congratulations. What a scoop.

    A question, not about his film but … ask him if he’d consider my book when making his next film. Here’s a short synopsis: Three children see an Apparition of Jesus and the news soon spreads throughout town. People react to it differently – some negatively. The children’s parents are subjected to malicious gossip and vicious attacks. Their Parish priest has a crisis of faith. The Church wants the story to just go away; whilst the children insist it is true. Especially when Jesus appears again . and again. Imagine this happened to you. How would you have reacted in the circumstances? This traditional story in a modern setting challenges its readers to undergo a reality check and re-affirm their Christian beliefs. A must for every Christian! This Christian book’s message is relevant to today’s troubled world.

    “VISIONS” ISBN 978 1 60477 032 2
    http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Visions.html?id=JRbMcip-bq8C&redir_esc=y

    God bless.

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